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Full text of "Foreign crops and markets"

Historic, archived document 



Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



/ 




ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT CF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D C. 



Vol. 36 March 12, 1938 No. 10 



LATE CABLES... 

Argentine cotton production for 1937-38 officially 
forecast at 332,000 bales of 478 pounds each from record plant- 
ing of 1,035,000 acres, compared with 143,760 bales from 
713,500 acres harvested in 1936-37. Drought damage last year 
caused abandonment of more than 300,000 additional acres 
planted. On account of drought and late frosts this season, 
trade estimates for the new crop are substantially lower than 
the official forecast of 332,000 bales. (Agricultural Attache 
P. 0. Nyhus, Buenos Aires.) 





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o 







See article on United States foreign trade in agricultural 
products from July through January 1937-38, pages 130 to 
143, inclusive. 



126 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 10 



' Ar genti ne corn prospects poor 

The 1937-58 Argentine corn crop is unofficially estimated at 
177,000,000 "bushels on the basis of observations made during a recent 
field trip "by Agricultural Attache P. 0. Eyhus at Buenos Aires. This 
would point to a reduction of over 50 percent from the 1935-37 harvest of 
359,615,000 bushels and would be the smallest crop in Argentina since 
1922-23, when 176,103,000 bushels were produced. The 10-year average 
production, 1926-27 to 1935-36, was 325,667,000 bushels. Prospects were 
found by Mr. 1'yhus to be good in a small central portion of the corn 
zona, but conditions over the greater part of the corn acreage ranged 
from poor to complete failure. See table on page ikk. 

Stocks of old-crop corn in Argentina are practically exhausted. 
The export movement which starts about April 1 will, therefore, bo con- 
siderably smaller than during the past several years. 

Manchuri an soybe an expo rt s .decline 

Soybean exports from Manchuria are running below last season, 
according to a report of Vice Consul Pasquet, transmitted by radio from 
the Shanghai office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. Exports of 
soybeans for the 4 months, October- January 1937-38, are estimated at ap- 
proximately 200,000 short tons below the amount exported during the 
corresponding period last season. Exports of bean oil for the first 4 
months of the current marketing season were approximately 4,000 tons 
larger than last year, while Manchuri an beancake and meal exports we re 
about the same as last season. The 1937 Manchurian soybean crop was of- 
ficially estimated at 153,330,000 bushels compared with 152,375,000 
bushels harvested in 1936. 



MAIvCFJJPIA: Exports of soybeans and soybean products , 
October-January 1935-37 and 1937-33, and exportable 
su rp lu s , J ana ary 5 1 , 1 957 and 1 933 



Item 


Exports 
Octcber-J anu a rv 


Exp or table surplus 
January 31 a/ 


1935-37 


1937-38 a/ 


1937 


1938 


Soybeans b/ 

Bea.n cake and meal. 


1,000 
short tons 
1,015 
243 
13 


1,000 
short tons 

800 
250 
22 


1,000 
short tons 
1,180 
610 
55 


1,000 
short tons 
1 , 640 
730 
60 





Shanghai office, Bureau of Agricultural Economics. 

a/ Estimated, b/ For destination of Manchurian soybean exports see 
"Foreign Crops and Markets," February 12, 1938. 



March 12, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



127 



The soybean market during January was somev/hat less active than 
in December. Prices remained firm during the month and closed slightly 
higher than at the end of the preceding month. Reports of increased 
taxation in Manchuria caused a general advance in all commodities toward 
the close of the month. Prices for bean oil and soybeans are, however, 
considerably below a year ago. 



MANCHCJ5IA: Prices of soybeans and soybean products at Dairen, 
February 25, 1936, with comparisons 



J. Uwu 



Ave rage 
January 1957 



19 



"anuarv 27 



February 25 



Soybeans 

Bean cake and meal. 
Bean oil 



Cent s 
1.62 
1.06 
5.43 



Cents 
1.32 
1.01 

2.30 



Cents 
1.33 
1.02 
2.87 



Shanghai office, Bureau of A ;ri cultural Economics. 

Soybean arrivals at Dairen continued in volume, amounting to 
310,000 short tons in January compared with 341,000 tons for December. 
T/harf stocks of soybeans in Dairen at the end of January totaled 157,000 
tons compared with 142,000 tons a month earlier. 

English hop crop of 1957 sold 



The Hops Marketing Board, which controls the marketing of the 
English hop crop, has disposed of the whole of the 1937 crop, states a 
communication from the London office of the Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics. ' There are estimated to be about 7,000 pockets (of 168 pounds 
each) of the 1936 crop held by the Boo,rd in. ordinary storage at origi- 
nal valuation prices, but apart from these and foreign hops, there only 
remain the limited stocks of the 1929, 1930, and 1S31 crops of English 
hops available for sale between now and the next harvest. 

Mexican vegetable ex-ports heavy first half of February 

Exports of winter vegetables from the West Coast of Mexico through 
!\ogales during the first half of Febraary totaled 303 cars against 136 
and 218 cars, respectively, in the corresponding periods of 1937 and 
1936, according to Vice Consul Thomas M. Powell at Kogales. Total ex- 
ports from November 1 to February 15 through Kogales have amounted to 
1,041 cars against 738 last season and 726 cars in the same period of 
the 1935-36 season. The increase this season was in heavy exports of 
tomatoes, which made up about three-fourths of the total. Most of the 
remainder comprised green peas and peppers. 



128 



Foreign Crops and' Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 10 



Ample quantities of tomatoes and peppers are available for export 
"but the green pea season is ; bout over. Exports of tomatoes and green 
peas were expected to drop off rapidly luring the last half of February 
because of increasing competition from California and Florida crops. 
The exports of green peppers vfere expected to continue as long as prices 
remained favorable. 

Canada importing yellow soup peas 

The yellow soup-pea crop in Canada has been small for the past 
two seasons and as a result imports of this pea, which is largely con- 
sumed in the Province of Quebec, have increased a great deal, states a 
report from Joseph I. Touchette, American consul at. Montreal. The 
French- Canadian trade is very particular about the- type, of soap pea 
used, according to Mr. Touchette, and will take only, yellow soup peas 
which are free from splits and brown or black peas. The varieties most 
in demand are the large yellow known as the Victoria type, the medium 
yellow or Arthur type, and the small yellow or golden- vine type. The 
chief sources of supply for yellow soup peas are Belgium, the United 
States, the Netherlands, and Poland. The Canadian duty on this class 
of pea from the United States and most favored nations is three-f earths 
of a cent per pound. The wholesale price of such peas in Montreal on 
February 18 was from $2.40 to $2.60 per bushel. 

United Kingdom pork import quotas increased 

The British Board of Trade has recently increased the cured pork 
import quota allocations to foreign countries for the period January- April 
1938 by 1,120,000 pounds, 99,000 pounds of which have been assigned to 
the United States. The total quota for all foreign suppliers for the 
first 4 months of 1933 is 19 J, Oil, 000 pounds and that for the United 
States is 15,642,000 pounds. The January-April 1937 quota figures were 
196,755,000 pounds and 15.564,000 pounds, respectively. The 1933 
allocations are therefore still 2 percent below those of a year, earlier . 
Because of the attractive domestic market f or pork products in the 
United States as a result of decreased production during 1936 and 1937, 
shipments from the United States to the British market were consider- 
ably below quota allocations. Bart of the deficiency thus caused was 
compensated by increased imports under supplementary quotas from other 
foreign countries. 

The frozen pork import quota, at 10,752,336 pounds, allotted to 
the United States has been increased for the first 6 months of the year 
over allocations made for comparable periods since 1935, when quotas be- 
came applicable for frozen pork. The January-June 1935-1937 allocations 
each totaled 7,429,296 pounds. The United States quota for 1936 was uti- 
lized only in small part, the remainder being reallocated to Argentina. 



March 13, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



129 



UNITED KINGDOM: 



Quota allocations and Import 
"by quota countries, 1935-19? 



s of cured pork, 
7 



Country 



percent 
of 
total 
quo ta 



19g£ 



Quota 



Imports 
i/ 



1935 



Quota 



Iranorts 
a/ 



Quota 



Denmark. 
Netherlands. 
Poland. . . 
Sweden. . . 
Lithuania. 
Estonia. . 
Pinland . 
Latvia. . . 
Soviet Union. 
Argentina. 
United States. 

Total quota 
countries. 

Total all 
countries . 



perc ent 
53.50 
9.50 
7.95 
4.70 
2.95 
0.75 
0.40 
0.70 

0.35 
0.70 
/8. 30 



1 , 000 
pounds 



387 , 845 
58,024 
48,557 
28,705 
18,018 
4,547 
2,477 
4, 335 
d , 2o4 
4,335 
48,853 



1 , 000 
pounds 
429,936 
57,472 
52,959 
18,524 
28,317 
5,199 
2,498 
3,575 
5,209 
6,174 
49,478 



1,000 
po und r, 
363,419 
54,370 
45,499 
25,899 
15,683 
4,332 
2,310 
4,042 
4,909 
4,042 
45,785 



1,000 
pounds 



379,174 
54 , 931 
49,248 
27,064 
21,579 
4,346 
2,340 
4,073 
4,569 
5,995 
59,307 



1 , 000 
-pounds 
374,519 
55 , 045 
45,901 
27,729 
17,405 
4,425 
2,350 
4,128 
5,014 
4,128 
47,195 



100.00 



511,073 



559,941 



573,490 



593,325 



589 ,951 



850,591 



819,97 0 



Official sources, ay Unadjusted for reexports, p_/ Plus 0.1 percent. 



Danish ho? rxombersjlecline 



Hog numbers in Denmark declined considerably during 1937, accord- 
ing to American Vice Consul E« Gjessing at Copenhagen. 

DENMARK: Hog numbers, December 31, 1937, 



wi th c omnar i sons 



Classification 


: 1935 


1937 


i Nov. 21 


Nov. 30 


Dec. 31 




' Thousands 


Thousands 


Thousands 






18 


18 


Sows 












255 


269 






16 


10 






24 


15 






2,07* 


1,907 


Slaughter nigs over 132 pounds... 




594 


484 






2,981 


2,704 



Denmark is the principal supplier of cured pork to the British 
market, having been granted by treaty an assurance of 53.5 percent of 



130 



Foreign Or ops and; Markets 



Vol. 35, No. 10 



the total import quota allotted to foreign countries by the United 
Singdo.ii. The decline in hog numbers is a direct consequence of the 
British quota restrictions. Because of the quota, imposed, there have 
been a decreasing number of pigs delivered to Great Britain « The de- 
crease vas greatest in 19,55 « In 1936, about 55,000 carcasses were ex- 
ported weekly to Great Britain. At present, according to the quota 
restrictions for the period February 1 to April 30, 1933, approximately 
91,000,000 pounds may be delivered during the above period, which cor- 
responds "to about 63, 5C0 carcasses per week. Germany takes at present 
3,000 per week, and 10,000 per week are used 'for home consumption. 



UNITED STATES FOREIGN AGP I CULTURAL SPADE,' JULU-JAUUAEI 1937-38 



The current reversal of the United States position in the inter- 
national exchange of farm products is 1 brought' out strikingly in trade 
figures for January. Farm exports for the month were valued at 92 mil- 
lion dollars, compared with 61 million during January 193?. The corre- 
sponding figures for the principal competitive farm imports were 35 
million dollars and 50 million dollars, respectively! In other words, 
tne value of our agricultural exports rose by 51 percent between these 
two periods, while that of our principal competitive agricultural imports 
fell by 42 percent.' 

Trade in January thus continued the trend that has been in 
evidence throughout the current fiscal year, starting in July. Dur- 
ing the Jul; --January period the United States exported 557 million 
dol.la.rs' worth of farm produce - 20 percent more than the 474 million 
dollars' worth shipped to foreign countries during the corresponding 
period a year earlier. Principal imports of farm products of a com- 
petitive nature decreased 7 percent for the same period. 

The significance of these comparisons becomes more apparent 
upon an analysis of some of the leading commodities involved. 

Grains 

' Grains provide the outstanding example^, of. the .shift in the 
agricultural export -import situation. . .. , .. 

The following table shows the United States net imports or . net 
exports of the' leading grains during. January this year as compared with 
January 1937. In January a year ago the United States was importing 
large quantities of corn, wheat, rye', ' and' barley malt, and net exports 
of rice were at a. low level. In January this year the United States 
exported large quantities of wheat, corn, rice, and- a. small quantity of 
rye, while imports of barley and barley malt were less than half what 
they were a "ear earlier. 



March 12, 1933 Foreign. Crops and Markets 131 

UNITED STATES IOSEI3S 'tQmdGL'MxL ERADE, JUL Y- J ANUABY 1937-35, CONT'D 

UNI IS) STATES:, Net foreign trade, in certain grains and grain 
products,, January 1937 and 1933 a/ 



Commodity and- date 









Thousands 




Wheat and wheat flour b/ January 1 


937 


Bu. \ 


1,421 ■ , 




• : January 1 


935 


-bu* ■ 




10,042 








5,393 








.13,215 




Bu.j 


125 




Bu, : 
Bu. j 


249 


Barley and malt c/: January 1937.. 


• • • 


752 


January 1 938 . . 


* • ■ 


Bu • ! 


350 




Milled rice: January 1937 

January 1933 


• « • 

* * • 


Lb# . 
Lb . . 




5 ''15 
43.431 



Unit 



Net imports 



Net exports 



a/ Preliminary, b/ In terms of bushels of wheat. Exclude? both wheat 
imported in bond for reexport as flour and flour milled from imported 
vheat. cj In terms of bushels of barley. 

The fig-ares for the July to January period show a similar shift 
in cur foreign trade in grain, although, in the case o" corn, the effect 
of the larger 1937 crop did not become apparent until -"October. 

The primary cause of the reversal of our foreign trade in w heat 
was the increase in United States production. The 1937 crop was 39 per- 
cent above that of 1935, while total Traduction in foreign countries a/ 
was practically unchanged. In pre-depression years, the bulk : of our 
wheat grain exports went to Western Europe, much of it being shipped 
via Canada. Wheat flour exports, on the other hand, were widely distrib- 
uted among countries of the Orient, Latin America, and continental 
Europe. This year's restored trade has followed the same lines. The 
largest wheat grain shipments during the 7-month period went to the 
United Kingdom, Belgium, and the Netherlands, each of these countries 
taking more than 5 million bushels direct from the United States and in 
addition a substantial Quantity of American wheat through Canada. The 
largest takers of wheat flour (milled from domestic wheat) were the 
Philippines, the Netherlands, Cuba, and Kong Kong (probably largely for 
China), each of which purchased more than 150, 000 barrels. 

In the case of corn , the effect of a big increase in United States 
production was reinforced by that o^ a decrease in production abroad. 
United States corn production in 1935 was, with the exception of 1934, 
the lowest in 55 years. The 1937 crop, on the other nand, was the largest 
since 1932 and was well above the 1928-1932 average. It was 75 percent 
larger than that of 1935. On the other hand, total com production in 



a/ World excluding United States, China, and the Soviet Union. 



132 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 10 



TOUTED STATES KJHE.IGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE, JULY- JANUARY 1937-38, CONT'D 

foreign countries was 9, -percent smaller in 1937 than in 1936. In the 
case of Argentina, the principal exporting country, the 1937 crop was 
only about half as large as that of 1936. As a result, the United States 
is exporting large quantities of corn to Europe for the first time in 
many years. 

The large increase in exports of rice has been due chiefly to the 
heavier purchases by Cuba. In the period July to January, Cuba accounted 
for 71 percent of our total rice exports against only 24 percent in the 
same period a year earlier. This rise in exports to Cuba was due mainly 
to increased tariff preference for United States rice during the period 
August 10 to December 31, 1937. 

P ork and lard 

The principal development in the pork and lard export situation 
during the current fiscal year has been the 74-percent rise in the ex- 
ports of lard. This has taken place largely because of a drop in the 
price of lard, resulting from two factors: first, there has been a de- 
cided improvement in the- domestic fats and oils situation as a whole, on 
account of the recent rise in cottonseed-oil production; and second, lard 
stocks are being reduced to a. minimum at this time in anticipation of the 
low jorices which will doubtless prevail when the large 1937 feed produc- 
tion has been turned into increased hog numbers available for slaughter. 

Exports of cured pork are not subject to these same influences- 
Hence, they continue at a low level and may be expected to do so until 
the hog supply situation has had time to improve. 

Other export produ cts 

Most of the other leading farm products which we normally export 
have increased in quantity for the 7-month period. C otton was up 13 per- 
cent, a large increase to the United Kingdom and smaller increases to 
most other markets having more than offset a 72-percent decrease in ship- 
ments to Japan. Flue-cured tobacco exports were up 16 percent, a rise 
to the United Kingdom in this case also having more than made up for the 
decrease in exports to China and Japan. 

Among the fruit s, exports of apples, pears, grapes, raisins, and 
dried prunes rose in response to materially increased production and in 
some cases to reduced import restrictions in foreign countries resulting 
from trade agreements. Citrus fruits, on the other hand, moved in con- 
siderably smaller quantity, chiefly due to last winter's freeze in the 
western States. Exports of canned fruits, as a group, increased substan- 
tially. 



March 12, 1S3S 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



133 



UNITED STATES FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL TRADE, JULY- JANUARY 1937-33, CONT'D 

Import commodities 

January figures for commodities normally imported reflect the im- 
proved domestic supply situation most strikingly in the cases of Cheddar 
cheese, hogs, cattle, butter, and egg products. Each of these items was 
more than 60 percent below its January 1937 level (see table on page 143). 
The trade in most oils and fats with the conspicuous exception of cotton- 
seed oil, has not yet felt the full effect of the nei/ situation. Cotton- 
seed oil production has increased greatly and the United States has been 
restored to its normal position as a net exporter. Daring the 5 years 
1925-1929, the United States was the world's largest exporter of cotton- 
seed oil. 

United States imports of wool were 48 percent smaller during the 
first 7 months of the current fiscal year than during the corresponding 
period of last year. This was due primarily, however, not to a change in 
the supply situation but to a reduction in demand. The index of factory 
consumption of wool in the United States averaged only 77 for the 7 months 
this year as compared with 131 for the preceding year. 



UNITED STATES : Exports of principal agricultural products, 
July-January 1936-37 and 1937-58 







July— January a/ 


Commodity exported 


jUnit 


Qaant 


ity 


Value 






1936-37 


1557-58 


1936-57 


1937-38 










1,000 


1,000 


ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS: 




'Thousands' 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Animals, live: 
















3 : 


2 


170 


253 






o/ j 


1 


4 


6 




: No. 


3 ; 


473 


383 


Mules, asses, and burros.... 


: No. 


1 j 


2 


152 


356 


Dairy x>roducts: 














i Lb. 


483 j 


394 


159 


152 


Cheese - 












Processed cheese & spreads 


: Lb. 


c / 35 ! 


399 


c/ 8 


95 




. Lb. 


d/ 532 : 


313 


d/ 142 


77 




• Lb. 


617 ; 


712 


150 


172 


Milk - 












Fresh and sterilized 


Gal. 


37 j 


38 


28 


28 




• Lb. 


933 | 


5, 622 109 


696 




Lb. 


2,067 j 


2,35? 452 


551 




Lb. 


12,-857 : 


13,959 


978 


1,012 



Continued - 



134 foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 36, No. 10 



UNITED STATES: Exports of principal agricultural products, 



Tnl -rr Vi 

v uj c, 


uary 1936-37 and 


1937-38, 


cont ' d 










July-January a 


7 


ooniniocLi oji expoiLeci 


Uni b 


Quantity 


Value 




1936-37 


1937-38 


: 1936-37 


1937-38 










: 1,000 


1,000 


ANIMALS AND AKH.IAL PEODUCTS, COM 'I 


) 


Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Dairy products, cont'd: 












Infants' foods, malted, etc. . 


Lb. 


1,560 


2,106 


; 480 


638 




Doz . 


963 


, . 1,451 


: 302 


405 


Meats and meat products: 












Beef and veal- 














Till 


2,123.. 


j . . 2,278 . 


340 


407 




T,Tn 
u u • 


5,615 


. ' \ 3,267. 


: 456 


353 


Hannpd bppf" i it 1 ! povnprl . . 


L"b. 


1 O'XO 
X , t~>*- J <j 


1,322 


392 


474 




JjU . 


0' O r ""~i 
p , ( yj 


6 , 867 


1, 188 


1, 234 


P ork.— 














T "h 


1,925 


3 ,425 


: 327 


563 


no HY1 -' 


Jj 0 . 


2 595 


2, 284 


: 449 


. 423 




T"h 
JjU . 


PP V71 
, O i X 


P4 m ^ 

C-t: , W J_0 


4 801 


5 033 


oio.es , uuiuuGr. co w i x u sn i re . . 


T,"n 
Xl u . 


P 7P, 






c, 
D 




Id . 


6,388 


5, 684 


; 728 


COD 


Cannpd .... . ... ... 


T,h 


A 7<d.£ 

1 , 1 rO 




1 PP4 




T o f, n 1 v) o 


LD . 


303 


39,287 


7, 971 


8 , 166 


M*CL"btO"P tt*^] 1 mn"b ... 


T Vi 
Jj 0 . 




; oUo 


Dei 


u 1 




T T-i 
Jj D . 


nn r- 

ro O 




, irb 


<OOC5 


Sausage— 














Lb. 


79 7 


64o 


21o 


IOC 


Other sausage 


L7b. 


' ' ' '670 


735 


T /in 

; 142 


1 ( 1 


Other meats- 












Fresh, frozen, or cured .... 


Lb. 


Lei , c34:3 


• ■ ' 'c r zo r z. 

3 , OOO 






Canned, incl. canned 














L"b . 




1 1 Pfi 


: ??4 


157 










T 1 ^49 




T "K 
Jj D . 


c o , '-to ( 








T "K 
LD . 


n 


• oo 




62 


r-\T 1 ft CP f~\ f \ i~i -t -vi r" 11 

OcXu.s£tge Ccisxiigs 


lb'. 


15 480 


; 14 , 39 1 


i 3 , 173 


3,339 


f)ll R Ti Y\r\ "f nf o n "Ti "l TTl n 1 • 

W J — L O ^IILL X (J,UO j CW 1X111 C*X. • 












T , *~i Y*ri n "p r~* \ ~t i r\ "i v\ vi pn l f t*i-i 1 
UcxXfJ., X XlOXU-Ll J-Il^j IluLLOIcl-L • 


Lb- 


60-, 077 


■■ 104,742 


i 7,396 


11, 341 


(il da 1 


Lb. 


4,915 


j 3,654 


': 491 


451 


0 le o s t o r»,1r . - . 


Lb- ' 


■ 2 V 333 


: : 1,689 


: 228 


203 


Stearins and fatty acids 


Lb. 


- 1,560- 


i ".' 768 


: 129 


75 




Lb. 


• 9 54 


!■ ■ 860 


: 66 


72 


Other animal oils and fat,;, . . . 


Lb. 


■4,943 


; ■ 3,020 


; 385 


278 




Lb. 


74,781 


: 114,733 


; 8,695 


12,420 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS: 












Cotton, unmfd: (Bales of 500 Id.) 














Bale 


3,762 


4,235 


• 239,758 


222,794 




Bale 


191 


: 226 


4,649 


4,624 



Continued - 



March 12, 1933 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



UXTEED STATES: Exports of principal agricultural products, 

July- January 1936-37 and 1937-33, cont'd 



'~'.-l.y- January a; 



Commodity everted 


. Unit 


• Quantity 


Va! 


ue 






19 36-37 


1937-38 


1935-37 


1937-38 


v.; : -/err, : . . . ; ,• 








1,000 . 


.1,000 


Fruits : 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Ap"ole s— 
















154 
3,807 
330 
14,474 
22 , 5-±3 
352 
1,775 


415 

4,494 . 


290 
'. . 5,777 


712 

5,936 








' Bbl. 

Tjb 


680 
' 13,343 


1,585 
1,345 
2,834 
300 
. . 5,193 


2,712 
1,508 
2,422 
711 
3,677 






: Lb . 


21,835 
317 




I Bex 


.1,317. 




Lo . 


125,731 


' 127,894. 


4,530 


4,766 


Prunes, dried ■ 


■ Lb. 


95,332 


132,699 


. . 4,986. 


5,925 




; Lb. 


68,619 
144,462 


' 105, 273 
166,749 


. 3,699. . 
10,902 


5,370 
13,591 






Nuts: 






: Lb. 


1,204 


2,199 


218 


322 






11,570 


.9,672 


1,151 


968 


Grains, flour, and meal: 






: Bu. 


3, 820 
1 


11,353 

370 


2, 790 
1 


8,081 

274 


Buckwheat, gram (48 Id.) 


■ 3u. 


Corn, inci. corn meal (56 lb.) 


; 3u. 


385 


19 ,'218 ' 


452 


13,487 


Malt. (34 It.) 


\ Bu. 


21 


100 ' 


27 


163 


Oats, including oatmeal (32 lb.) 
Sice- 


j Bu. 


515 


'7,756 ' 


849 


3,381 




'■ Lb . 


2,254 
21,275 


10,018 
19 5, '3 3 5 " 


. 47 
697 


275 
6,085 




: Lb. 


Screenings ."broken, flour, etc. . 


: Lb. 


76 


257 


2 


9 




i Bu . 


1 


4,264 


c 


3,677 


Tftieat flour- (196 lb.) 










: 3bl. 


679 


. . l.,873 


3 , 228 


9 ,384 




: Bbl. 


1,604 ' 


. 1..01S. . 


3,244 


6.396 




: Bbl. 


2,233 
1,765 


. . 2., 891. . 
39,451 


11, 472 
1 , 730 


15. 7£0 
43,259 


Tftieat, grain (50 lb.) 


: Bu. 


"Jheat, including flour 

Cottonseed cake and ^ Qa i 

Oils, vegetable: 


j Bu. 


12 497 


53,04-0 


13 , 202 


59 .059 


; L.ton 
: L . t on 


3 

113 


58 


108 
, 3 , 419 


1,635 
5,321 


Coconut oil- 












Edible 


j Lb. 


1,346 


j 1,085 


: 87 


79 


Inedible 

Cottonseed oil- 


: Lbi 


4,383 


j 4,486 


249 


241 


Refined 

Corn oil 

Linseed oil 


: Lb. 
: Lb. 
: Lb. 
: Lb. 


91 
1,239 

383 
603 


i 2,476 
. 4,275 
179 
476 


11 

152 
33 
59 


160 
320 
21 
53 



Continued - 



136 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 36, So. 10 



UNITED STATES: Exports of principal agricultural products, 



July -J 

, 


anuary 


1036-37 and 1037-38, 


cont ' d 






_ — , 


' July-January a/ 


Commodity exported 


Uni t 


Quantity 


Value 






193i3-37 • 


1S37-33: 


1936-37 


1937-38 


VEGETABLE PT)T7*('IT"; OOKTT'NUEU ■ ; 








1 , 000 


1,000 


Oil 0 . vp^'ptflhl h ponf H ' 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars ; 


dollars 




Li 0 < 


2,054 


2,845 : 


144 ; 


264 


Vpffpfia mi ^ cno"n c "h nr»V* 


T,"h 


10,975 


5,660 


558 : 


461 - 




Jj D . 


c/ 9 


76,445 i 


c/ b/ 


1, 435 


? nF „ r t p nno "i >■ ^ 


Ton 


42 


34 


1 , 760 


1,599 


Tobacco leaf: ! 














Lb . 


234,970 


271,667 


96,089 


106,766 




1j d . 


6,118 


5,510 


1,277 


1,377 


Dark-fired Ky • & Tennessee . ' 


Lb . 


16,123 


17,815 


2,271 


2,989 




Lb . 


5,131 


4,799 


1,223 


1,244 


Maryland and Ohio export ..... 


Lb . 


2,612 


2,2'97 ' 


' 539 


658 




Lb . 


1,691 


839 


147 


214 




Lb. 


504 


157 


48 


13 


Black fat , wate r Dale r , &dk . k£ ■ 


Lb. 


5 992 


4,649 ' 


1,052 


919 


Cigar leaf ' 


$ Lb . 


312 


625 


186 


393 




Lb. 


72 


31 


23 


14 


Total leaf tobacco ......... 


Lb . 


273, 525 


308,389 


102,855 


114, 587 


Tobacco, other than leaf: 




c/ ' 51 










Lb. 


442 


c/ 4 


14 




Lb . 


e/l5,388 


7,167 


e/ 532 


* 131 




Lb. 


15,439 


7,609 


■ 536 


145 


Vegetables: '• 














Lb . 


2, 174 


1,512 


98 


99 


Be^ns rlripr! 


Lb 


2,394 


5 , 228 


110 


210 


1 1 Y"l "1 i"\ i-» 


T "h 

JjD . 


30,088 


28,736 


459 


584 




Lb . 


705 


692 


39 


45 




Lb . 


4,19 2 


5, 603 


140 


173 




Lb . 




238 


11 


15 




T T-, 

LD . 


57,363 


91,276 


1,044 


1,038 




Lb . 


6,013 


: 7,198 


232 


267 


( vegetables, canned , 


Lb . 


20,182 


31,372 


.1,963 


2, 773 


Misc. vegetable products: 












Cornstarch and corn flour .... : 


Lb. 


18,611 


47,310 


668 


•1,303 




Lb . 


14,631 


19,236 


; 447 


594- 




Lb. 


1,055 


' ' 4,229 


407 


729 




Lb. 


3,089 


3,435 


: 1,315 


; 342 


TOTAL PRINCIPAL AC-PI CULTURAL PROD' 








449 , 744 


537,645 


TOTAL AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS ; 








474 , 441 


567,155 


TOTAL EXPORTS, ALL COMMODITIES. . ' 






1, 502,578 


2,073,742 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Corrected to March 3, 1938. b/ Less than 500. c/ One month (January)'-. Not 
separately classified prior to January 1, 1937. d/ Includes 'Processed cheese" 
prior to January 1, 1937. e/ Includes "Trimmings and scrap" prior to January 1, 
1937. 



March 12, 1938 



Eorei,~n Croon and Markets 



137 



UNITED STATES: Imports (for consumption) of principal agricultural products, 

July- January 1936-37 and 1937-33 









July-J 


1 — 

aruary a/ 




C ommodi ty imp ort ed 


: Unit 




nt i ty 


Value 




■ 1936-37 


. 1937-38 


1936-37 


IS 37-33 


COMPETll'ivij 








; 1,000 


1,000 


ANIMALS AND ANIMAL P20DUCTS: 




thousands 


' Thousands 


: dollars 


dollars 


Animals, live: 












Cattle- 












Dutiable { by weight )- 












Less than 175 pounds each. 


No. 


27 


: 27 


j 360 


' 448 


175 pounds and less than 














No . 


82 


: 95 


: 1,149 


1,669 


700 pounds or more.each- 












Cov-s for dairy purposes. 


No . 


4 


4 


; 233 


276 


Other cattle 


No . 


56 


82 


; 2,418 


5,185 


Total cattle (dutiable) 


No. 


169 


208 


4 , 160 


7 , 578 


Free (for "breeding) 


No . 


7 


7 


: 627 


632 


Hogs ( except for breeding) . . . 


Lb . 


13,434 


5,540 


; 1,106 


529 


Dairy products: 


No. 


7 


4 


: 1,011 


880 




Lb. 


7,584 


1,833 


; 1,646 


455 




Lb . 


7 , 724 


835 


713 


88 


Cheese- 














Lb. 


5,404 


7,545 


1,496 


1,796 




Lb. 


7,427 


1,991 


1,045 


314 




Lb. 


27,637 


24,106 


5,801 


5,127 




Lb. 


40,513 


33,642 


3 , 342 


7 , 237 




C-al . 


44 


83 


65 


125 


Mi lk- 












Condensed and evaporated ... 


Lb. 


1,532 


846 


69 


41 




Lb. 


11,158 


194 


590 


22 


TChole , skim, and buttermilk . . 


C-al. 


36 ■ 


13 


8 


3 


Eggs and egg products: 














Doz . 


283 


179 


47 


38 


Egg albumen, dried : 


Lb. . 


1,699 


1,542 


664 


574 




Lb. ' 


3,214 , 


2,799 


457 


547 


Other egg products 


Lb. 


1,093 


884 


183 


154 


Hides and skins, agricultural b/ • 
Meats and meat products: i 


Lb. 


167,246 - ' 


138,929 


29,788 


31,619 


Beef and veal- : 














Lb. . 


2,086 1 


3,146 


178 


327 




Lb. • 


1,221. : 


1,108 


99 


99 




Lb. : 


38,555. . 


48,420 . 


3,531 


5,095 




Lb. : 


54 ; 


31 ' 


8 


5 


Pork- m : 














Lb. .; 


9,090 | 


11 , 102 j 


1,222 j 


1,755 


Earns, shoulders, and bacon.. ' 


Lb. : 


13,933 : 


25,038 ; 


5,117 


6,904 


Pickled, salted, and other.. \ 


Lb. 


1,682 : 


4,149 : 


424 ' 


1,099 



Continued - 



133 



Foreign ■Cro'ps rnd Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 



UNITED STATES: Imports (^or consumption) of principal agricultural -oroducts, 
July-January 1935-37 and 1937-33, cont'd 



Commodity imported 

O OMPBTItTvE, OOHT Tp 
ANIMALS AND AN B.1AL PRODUCTS, COITT'IJ 
Meats and meat products, cont'd: 

Poultry snd game , 

Other meats- 
Fresh ■ 

Canne d , prepare d , or pr e se rve d 

Total meats 

Sausage casings 

Tallow • 

Wool, unmfd., excluding free 

in bond 

VEGETABLE PRODUCTS : 
Coffee imported into Puerto Rico 
Cotton, unmfd: (473 11). bale) 

Raw, except linters 

Linters 

Eeed s and fodder s : 
"Beet pulp, dried (2,240 lb.)'.., 
Bran, shorts, etc.-.(2,000 lb.) 

Of direct importation 

Withdrawn bonded mills 

Total bran, shorts, etc. .. 

Hay (2,000 lb.) 

Oil cake and oil-cake meal- 
Coconut 

Cottonseed 

Linseed 

Soybean 

All other 

Total oil cake end meal . . . 
Erui ts : 

Berries, natural state 

Currant s 

Dates 



July- Jan uary a/ 



Unit 



Quantity 



Value 



igs 

Crape s , 

Lemons 

Limes 

Pineapples- 
Fresh 

Prepared or preserved ........ 

Product of the Philippine Is, 





: 1935-37 


1937-33 . 


1956-57 


1937-38 









1 , 000 


1 , 000 




: Thousands 


Thousands : 


dollars 


dollars j 


Lb . 


953 


1,027 . 


242 


3051 


T 1 

J J u • 


240 


57j_ 


47 


96 I 


Lb . 


; 73 


110 


22 


32J 


Lb . 


72,877 


" 94-" 702 '■ 


' 10,940 


15,717 


Lb. 


8,737 


3,999 . 


4,359 


5,064 1 




- - , I 1*5 


1,1// . 


, 1 OO 


OO 1 


Lb, 


j 80,513 


'"Z/L O O Q . 


21 , 548 


-in 'ion , J 

11 ,i88 


Lb. 


' 0 ' 


0 


0 


0 1 


Bale 


yo 


OO 


o , coo 


A AO/ 
, O O'x 


Bale 


OU 


1U 


q rz 
Doc 


-LOO j 


ion 


in 


D 


ooo 


J.UU 


: Ton 


: 204 


' ' 21 | 


4,601 


479 J 


ion 




4^- 


j.. , i OO 


i i n? 1 

X , J- OO 


j- on 


... I *± 


bo 


o , U O 




ion 


yu 




OOf 




.u D . 


■r O , -t CO 


O 3 , 3 0*± 1 


41 P 


1 012 i 


T ~U 

JjO • 




O j ± V O 






Lb. 


• 28,097 


0,170 ; 


315 


1 84 I 


Lb . 


■ CO, (Of 


32,620 j 


333 


469 


T "h 

Jj D . 


p., <->pu. 


1(3,1 OX 


77 
< ». 


21 3 


T It 


j. o5 , 2p5 




1 47 R 


1,363 


Lb. 


1 5., 991 


5,330 : 


399 


386 1 


Lb. 


; ^ K70 


; 4 491 ; 


307 


261 1 


Lb . 


; 47,032 


; 45; 358 ; 


1 , 741 


; 1,535 


• LP. 


1 5,878 


: 5,742 \ 


401 


385 1 


■ Cil . ft . 


. 13 


: 15 : 


33 


i 38 


: Lb. 


: . . 573 


: 4,540 i 


18 


141 1 


: Lb. 


: 6,145 




162 


1301 




/ 

c/ 


j c/ 1 


188 


15ll 


' Lb. 


•; 3,595. 


: 13,101. : 


398 


631 


; Lb. 


: 8,155 


; 19,822 • 


341 


: 936' 



Continued - 



parch 12, 1938 



foreign Crops and Markets 



139. 



UNITED STATIS: Inmcrts (for consumption) of principal agricultural products, 

" July^-Jaftuary 1936-37 and 1937-38', cont'd 



July-January a/ 



Commodity unportea ; 


unit 




Cuan 


t ity 


Value 


i 

L 




1936 


-37 


1937-38 


1936-37 ■ 


1537-38 












- - - 


1,000 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, COITT'D: ! 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars : 


dollars 


Fruits, cont'd: : 
















Id . 




538 


A rr A 

454 - 


44 


52 


Olives m trine- .; 














Green or ripe (not pitted; . ; 


Gal . 




603- 


1,322 


823 ; 


860 




Gal . 


1 , 


777 


1,235 


1,335 : 


1 , 252 


Total olives in "brine .... J 


Gal. 




38 5 


3.557 


2.158 


2,112 


Grains and grain predicts: I 
















Bu. 


8, 


994 


1,164 


7,734 


1,003 




Lb. 


214, 


349 


130 v 213 


5,426 


4,136 




Bu. 


31, 


219 


34,211" 


15,726 


' 24,781 


Sice- : 


■ Bu. 




113 


9. 


43 


6 




Lb . 


6, 


772 


4,996 


198 


158 


Cleaned or milled ; 


Lb. 


' 8, 


649 


4,310 


239 


128 




Lb. 




904 


598 


31 


18 


Meal, flour, and "broken . ... | 


Lb . 


74, 


906 


70,105 


1,291 


1,341 




Bu. 




861 


a/" 


2,475 


*J. 


Wheat, grain- (50 lb. bu.) : 














Dutiable at A2i per "bu ■ 


Bu. 


PA, 


175 


597 


24.170 


746 


Dutiable at 10$ ad valorem e/' 


Bu. 


3, 


866 


4 


3,132 


4 


Willed in bond for export- \ 
















Bu. 


2, 


336 


1,104 


2,339 


1,383 




Bu. 


5, 


892 


1,543 


5,437 


1,858 


Total v/heat grain ; 


Bu. 


36, 


270 


3,248 


35 • 123 


3,991 




Bbl. 




38 


16 


130 


37 




Bu. 


36, 


443 


~z 


35, 306 


4.078 




Lb. 


7, 


341 


5,691 


2,271 


1, 633 








ij 


cj 


12,111 


11,824 


Oils, vegetable: j 
















Lb. 


188, 


555 


'. 200,959 


, 7,855 


11,001 




Lb. 


16, 


373 


14,290 


1,150 


851 




Lb. 


54, 


430 


37,163 


3,091 


2,314 




Lb . 




221 


163 


: 11 


10 




Lb. 


33, 


477 


24,469 


4,256 


4,386 




Lb. 


'25, 


189 


; 8,350 


• . 1,949 


901 




Lb. 


20, 


543 


57,991 


1,026 


: 3, 955 


Palm oil ■ 


Lb. 


195, 


554 


256,518 


: 6,331 


10,298 


Peanut oil : 


Lb. 


6, 


069 


18,885 


; 377 


1 , 227 


Ferilla oil ! 


Lb. 


36, 


733 


27,861 


; 2,371 


1,547 


Baoeseed oil : 


Gal. 


3, 


206 


793 


: 1,515 


353 




Lb. 


2, 


413 


9,175 


; 120 


547 




Lb. 


11 


651 


10 


: 740 


1 




Lb. 


55, 


740 


85,721 


i 8,C07 


10,438 



Continued - 



140 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, Ko. 10 



UNITED STATES: Imports (for consumption) of principal agricultural nroducts, 

' July- January 1936-37 and 1937-38, cont'd 



Commodity imported 



COMPETITIVE 



VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, CONT'D 
Oilseeds : 

Castor beans 

Copra 

Flaxseed (56 lb. ) 
Palm nuts and kernel 
Se same seed ........ 

Soybeans 

Seeds, except oilseeds 
Sugar and molasses: 

Sugar (2,000 IV) 

Molasses- 

Erom Philippine Islands ... 
Unfit for human consumption 

Other molasses 

Total molasses 

Tobacco, unmanuf actured: 

Leaf 

Product of the Philippine Is. 

Stems, not cut 

Tobacco scrap 

Vegetables : 
Beans- 
Dried 

Green or unripe 
Chickpeas or garbanzos 
Garl i c 
Onions 

Peas, except cowp 

Dried 

Green 
Potatoes 
Tapioca, 
Toma.toes 
Turnips 

Vegetables, canned 
Eibers, vegetable: ( 



whi t e 
crude , flour , 
fresh 



& chi ckp ' s- 



Flax, unmanuf a.ctured 
Hemp, unmanufactured 
Jute and jute butts,unmfd 
Total principal competitive 
agricultural products 



dried 



,nd oren 



J40 lb. tori) 



Unit 



Quantity 



July- January a/ 



V alue 





1936-37 


1937-38 


1956-37 , 


1937-38 








1,000 : 


1,000 




1 LlQ ab c 'JlU-b . 


"FV; nn n nn^ t 1 
±ll'J LL; 'cillvJ-b 


U-OXXcxZ d 


A ol 1 CVG 


L D . 


92,616 ; 


98,192 


2,148 : 


2, 375 


Lb. 


194,690 ; 


359 ,"71 8' 1 


■ ' 4,508 : 


10,552 


Bu . 


9,681 : 


11,934 


12,517 


15,969 


Lb. • 


34,528 '; 


47,753 


728 


1,425 


Lb. 


15,193 • 


2,716 


514 


120 


Lb. 


247 • : 


107 


7 


3 




sJ 


c/ 


4,889 


4,324 


Ton 


1,210 


1,448 


• -67,267 


69,897 


Gal . 


0 ', 


0 


0 


0 


Gal . 


149,932 


140,625 


7 , 102 


7,602 


Gal . 


-112,049 




.. ... . Jr-I . S <LjL.- 


, 395 . 


Gal. 


161,981 


143,560 


. 8,513 


7,997 


Lb . 


35,024 


36 , 148 


17 , 986 


18 , ^25 


Lb. 


1 ,076 




o A 

94 


r-7 rj r> 


Lb . 


1 , 430 


1 , 697 


A *~i 

42 


C A 

64 


Lb . 


1,337 


1 , 534 


386 


A A O 


Lb. 


•19,324 


11,718- 


592 


469 


Lb. 


3,442- 


3,801 


95 


107 




7 , 178 


6,02o 


oo3 


OA O 


T "h 

jj D . 


1 , bob 


O'x r 


fx 


1 7 

X ( 


T,"h 


1 440 - 


pqq 

O ZJ Z> 




22 




i z> ( 


V Ql C 
X , X c 


?6 


71 


Lb. 


2 , 344 


1,629 


115 


79 


Lb. 


37 , 601 


13,068 


; • ■ 693 


197; 


Lb. 


194,894 


- 222-, 594 


1 -3,648 


4; 350 


Lb. 


33,814 


33,1-92 • 


. ■ 702 


728' i| 


Lb. 


96,088 


65 , 321 


• • 662 


| ■ 585 


Lb. 


43,591 


35 , 305 


: 1 ,740. 


j 1,656 


Ton 


3 • 


o 


!; 1,015 


i 881 


Ton 


1 




190 


: 57 


Ten 


33 


57 - 


■ 2,533 


1 4,559 

; — 








: 365,298 


1 341,116 



Continued - 



March 12, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



141 



UNITED STATES: Imports (for consumption) of principal agricultural products , 

July-January 1936-37 and 193 7-33. cont'd 



Commodity imported 



EOJi— "" OMPET x 'T * x "7E 
ANIMAL PRODUCTS: 

Silk, rev 

Wool, unmanufactured, free 

"bond for manufacture .... 
VEOETAbLE P30DUCT;S: 

Bananas 

Coffee, except through the 

of Puerto Face 

Cocoa or cacao beans 

Tea 

Spices 

Drags, herbs, ro^ts, etc. . 
Fibers, veg etable: (2,240 lb 

Kapok 

Manila 

Sisal and henequen 

Rubber, z rude: 

Milk of, or latex 

&uayule 

Other crude rubber 

Total rubber, crude . . . 
Total principal agricul tura 

Non-competitive products 

Competitive products .... 
TOTAL PRINCIPAL A.JRI CULTURAT 
PRODUCTS 



TOTAL ASRI CULTURAL PRODUCTS 
TOTAL IMPORTS, ALL COMMODITIES 



Unit 



July- January a / 

Quantity . • -Value; 





. 1936-37 


1 Q^7-^R 
.-t- v Q ■ . 


3.S36-37_ 


1337-38 








1,000 


1,000 




TVi mi <^ f\ ^ 








: Lb . 


42, 239 


50 ,187 


70 , 196 


54,4o7 


T ~h 


. . 3.7 , 78.8 


. 57,-572 


13,944 ' 


15.514 


: Bunch 


. 34,285. 


35 , 795 


16,655 ■ 


17,346 


L o . 


965,779 


883,938 


7^,298 


75,172 


• *TVi 
u □ • 


383,367 


.086,785 


23,407 


20,723 


: Lb. 


52,482 


53,850 


10 , 642 ; 


11,763 


■ Lb . 


105,250 


43,795 


8,228 


5,520 






si 


.4,111 - 


6,408 


: Ton 


9 


3 


2,132 • 


1,018 


: Ton 


18 


20 


2,569 ; 


3,8.06 


: Ton 


69 


. - 81 


• • 7-, 902 ; 


9,357 


Lb. 


26 , 109 


28,826 


4,226 ; 


5,510 


: Lb. : 


2,052 ; 


4,954. , 


241 ; 


613 


: Lb. ' 


_a59_u£z. ; 




. 1Q2U2Q2J 


141.931 


; Lb. 


687 . 298 : 


859 . 630 


106,669 I 


143,054 








348,803 •' 


370 , 238 








365,298 . 


341,116 








714.101 : 


711.354 








763,743 1 


762,071 



1,499,352 1,552,550 



Compiled from official records of 
a/ Corrected to March 3, 1933. 
b/ Excludes the weight of "Other 
pieces only. 

c/ Reported in value only. 

d/ Less than 500. 

e/ Unfit for human consumption. 



the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
hides and skin?." which are reported in 



142 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 3b, No. 10 



UNITED STATES; Exports (domestic) of specified agricultural products, 

January 1937 and 1938 a/ 



Commodity exported 



Bacon , 

Hams and shoulders b/ . 
Lard including neutral 



G-rains and •prepara tions: 

Barley (43 lb.) 

Corn .... (56 lb. ) 

Rice- 
Paddy (rough) 

Milled, incl. brown 

El our, meal, etc 

Wheat- 
Grain .... ( 60 lb . ) 

El our, wholly of 

United States wheat (196 lb.) 



Eruit s; 
Ere sh- 

Apples d/ 

Pears 

0 range s 

Grapefruit 

Dried- 
Apples 

Apricots 

Prunes 

Baisins 

Canned pears 

Tobacco leaf; 

Bright flue-cured 

Dark- fired Kentucky and 

Turrmessee 

Other leaf 

Total leaf tobacco . . . 
Cotton, excl. linters 
(Running bales) 



Unit 



Lb 



Bale 



■January-. 



J.2Z2. 



ThouaandiL 
215 



Lb . 


1, 803 


2,861 


Lb. 


8,855 


20 , 453 


3u. 


7 


1 , 230 


Bu. 


1 7 


13 , 2l<4 


Lb. 


1,097 


1,814 


Lb. 


9, 238. . 


43, 183 


Lu . 


/ 

£/ 


6 


Bu. . 


33 


b , 509 


Bbl . 


101 


333 


Bu. 


i yi2 


1 , old 


Lb . 


6 , 144. 


9,126 


Box 


253 


403 




r OO 


PC 

, OK.' 


Lb. 


1,292 


\ 1,357 


Lb. 


; 1,017 


: 1,597 


Lb. 


j 8,893 


i 21 , 010 


Lb . 


j 5,261 


8,944 


Lb. 


j 439 


j 9,787 


Lb . 


; 26, 763 


! 38,405 


Lb. 


i 2,216 


i 2 , 531 


Lb. 


3 , 003 


3, 156 


Lb. 


31.982 


: 44.092 







333 



J-9.33_ 



Thjma&o&s- 

627 



647 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce . 

a/' Corrected to March 3, 1938. b/ Includes Cumberland and Wiltshire 
sides. c/ Less than 500. d/ Includes baskets, boxes, and barrels in 
terms of bushels. 



March 12, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



143 



UKITSD STATES: Imports (for consumption) of specified agricultural products, 
: ; , January and 232B^J. 



Commodity imported 



■inimals . live : 
Cattle- 
Dutiable (by reight)- 

Less than 175 pounds each 
175 pounds and less than 

700 pounds each 

700 pounds or more, each- 

Co'.ts for dairy purposes ..... 

Other cattle 

Total cattle (dutiable) . . 

Free (for breeding) 

Hogs (except for breeding) 

Butter 

Cheese ■ 

Swiss 

Cheddar 

Other cheese 

Total cheese 

Sgg products ,excl. eggs in the shell 
Meat s : 

Beef end veal, fresh 

Beef, canned, incl. corned 

Pork, fresh 

Earns, shoulders, and bacon 

Tallow 

Wool c/ 

Grains : 



(56 lb. 



(32 lb . ) 
(56 lb.) 



uorn 

Oats 

Eye .... 

Wheat d/ (50 lb.) . 

Barley malt 

Oilseeds ; 

Copra 

Flaxseed. (55 lb.) . 
Oils, vegetable ; 

Coconut 

Palm 

Perilla 

Tung 

Sugar , raw ( 2 , 000 lb . ) 
Molasses 



NO, 



ho . 



No. 



.January 



1937 



pus and s 

4 
16 



No . 


'28 


8 


No . 


50 


22 


hO. 


• 1 


1 


Lb. 


: 2,560 


5 


Lb . 


! ? 3S0 


314 


Lb. 


| 255 


i 884 


Lb . 


; 415 


: 105 




i 3 , 6c 2 


; 2.200 


Lb . 


5 . 022 


3.169 


Lb. 


■ J. , liO 


364 


Lb . 


j ' 488' ' 


211 


Lb . 


: 1,174 


;" 3 , 075 


Lb. 


• 1,796 


: ' 794 


Lb. 


; 3,828 


: 2,523 


Lb . 


1 497 


: " 121 / 


Lb. 


26,172 


i 2,435 


Bu. 


5 , 410 


39 


Bu. 




: 3 


Bu. 


; 126 


: o 


Bu. 


■ 1,866 


! 4 


Lb. 


; 34,676 


13,370 


Lb. 


17,800 


: 50,663 


Bu. 


1 , 139 


j 1 , 457 


Lb. 


o9 y oD 2 . 


: . 32,965 


Lb . 


22,592. . 


: . . .27,192 


Lb . 


0 


i. 2,408 


Lb. 


4,227 . 


• . 6,833 


Ton 


213 


; . . 217 


G-al. 


18.981 


18,843 



Th cusan; 



4 
10 

/ 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce, ej Corrected to March 3, 1938. b/ Less than 500. cj Excludes 
wool imported free in bond for use in carpets, etc. d/ Includes only 
wheat full duty paid and 10 percent ad valorem. 



144 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, Ho. 10 



A2&S3TIMA: Production of specified crops, 1932-33 to 1937-38 



Official estimates 



Crop year 


■Wheat 


Ay e 


Oats 


"Ho -pi pi/ 


"h 1 ! oyqBBd 






1 , 000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 






"bushels 


"bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


1932- 


rz *7 

OO 


240,889 


12,598 


69 , 583 


32,150 


62,006 


1933- 


34 


286,120 


7,249 


57,388 


33,739 


62,595 


1934- 


35 


240,669 


15, 545 


62,052 


35,859 


79 , 720 


1935- 


36 


141,452 


6,023 


35,865 


20,301 


59 , 445 


1936- 


37 


249 ,.193 


7,480 


54,564 


29,854 


76,200 


1937- 


33 ' 


184,047 


3,582 


47,537 


23,699 


59 , 249 



AB&EKTIKA: Area, planted and harvested, and production of corn, 
1952-33 to 1957-38 



Tear 



Planted 



Harvested 



Production 



l.OQCLacre.- 



1.000 acres j 1.000 bushels 



1932- 33 

1933- 34 

1934- 35 

1935- 36 

1936- 37 
;p 



11, 539 
16,095 
17,368 
18 ,854 
15,973 
15, 185 



9,373 
10,161 
14,091 
12 , 650 
11,929 

9,111 



a / 



257,761 
256,913 
451 , 943 
395, 694 
359, 515 
177,000 



Of f i c i al s ou rc e s . 
a/ Unofficial. 

GSHlAEY 



Production of specified grains, 1932-1937 



Year 



TTheat 



Bye. 



Parley 



Oats 



1932.. . 
1933. . . 
1934. . . 
1935. . . 

1936 a, 

1937 a , 



1,000 bu shels 

183,830 ' 

205,920 . 

156,547 

171,488 

162,660 

164,132 



1,000 bushel s 



329', 255 
343 , 570 
299,496 
294,399 
290', 788 
272,307 



1,000 bush els; 



147, 647 
159,287 
147,152 
155, 586' 
155,117 
167,090 



1,000 bushels 

458,160 ' 
478,983 
375,631 
' 371,040 
387,072 
407, 713 



Official sources, 
a/ Saar included. 



March 12, 1935 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



145 



COTTON: Price 


per pound cf representative 


raw cotton a 


t Live 


rpcol , 








4. I£3 = wii. 




cri r> r> vi 
— *- 


s 














growth 






Tpnup.ry 




TTehruarv 




March 






















14 


21 


28 


4 


11 


18 


25 


4 








- 


n 




Gents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


.American - 








. 












Middling 




10.44 


10.27 


10.05 


10.30 


10.50 


10.81 


10.90 


10.72 


Low Middling 




6. 88 


6. 71 


5.48 


8.73 


6.93 


9. 24 


9.33 


9.15 


Egyptian (Fully Good 


Fair) - 


















Sakellaridis 


• •■••••>•■■ 


17.55 


17. 66 


17.20 


17.38 


17.30 


17.87 


17.94 


17.97 


Uppers 




13.25 


13.04 


12.61 


_l2 • j 3 


12.97 


13.47 


13.35 


13.05 


Brazilian (Pair) - 




















Ceara 




9. 61 


9.43 


9 21 


9.46 


9.c7 


9.97 


10.06 


9.89 


Sao Paulo 




10.44 


10.27 


10.05 


10.30 


10.50 


10.81 


10.90 


10.72 


East Indian - 




















Broach (Fully Good) 




8.40 


8.33 


8.21 


8. 46 


8.58 


8.84 


6.91 


6. 67 


C. P. Ccmra No. 1. 


Superfine . 


9.02 


8.89 


5. 78 


9.02 


9.25 


9.41 


9.47 


9.24 


Sind (Fully Good) . . 




8.19 


8.02 


7.80 


8.04 


8.20 


6.27 


8.11 


7.94 


Peruvian (Good) - 




















Tanguis; 




14. 60 


14.43 


14.22 


' 14.47 


14.69 


15.00 


15.08 





Converted at current exchange rates. 



UNITED STATES: Exports of cotton to principal foreign markets, 
annual 1935-36 and 1935-37, and the season 
.August 1 - ;.iarch 3, 1936-37 and 1937-38 aj 

- (Punning bales.) 



Country to 




1 .JUAV *± 




• - Marcn a 


which exported 


1935-36 


1536-37 


1936-37 


1937-38 




i,nnn >ai Hs 




l r 000 "bales 


1 . 000 "bales 


United Kingdom 


1,466 


1,220 : 


907 


1,358 


Continental Europe 


2,936 


2,587 


1,904 


2.413 


Total Europe 


4,402 


3,807 


2,811 


3,771 


Japan 


1,548 


1,592 \ 


1,109 . 


370 


Other countries 


333 


360 


245 


375 


Total. ' 


o,263 


5,779 


4 , 1 65 . . 


; 4,515 


L inters 


243 


259 


159 . 


163 


Total excluding linters... 


■6, 040 


5,520 


. 4,006 . 


4,333 



Compiled from the Weekly Stock and Movement Report, New York Cotton exchange. 
sj Includes linters. 



146 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 10 



BUT TEH: 



New Zealand grading, 1937-38 "'season to February 26, 

wi th com-oari s ons 



Date 


1934- 35" 




1936-37 


1^37-38 


Week ended 




i 


,000 pounds 


i , 000 pounds 


1,000 pounds 


1,000 pounds 


August 1- No venter 


27 




121 \ 700 


""117,628" 


1227713 


119,923 


December 4 '. 






10,192 


10,696 


10,696 


10, 696 


11 






9,968 


10,696 


11,032 


10,248 


13....' 






9,800 


10,080 


10,730 


11,144 


25 






8,904 


10,192 


7,168 


10,304 


Monthly total . . . 




38.864 


41 ,664 


33,626 


42,392 


J anuary 1 






8,400 


10,416 


12,208 


9,520 


R 

.«««■*«. 






8,456 


9,688 


• • 11,592 ■ 


10,136 


15.. 






8,116 


9, 520' 


• • -9,184 


9,408 


22' 






7, 616 


9, 738 


11 , 872 


3, 848 


29 






6; 944 




9^632 


8,020 


Monthly total . . . 






59 , .532 


48,658- 


54,438 


45,932 


February 5 






6,272 


9,134 


10 , 136 


: 3,120 


12 






5,656 


8,798- 


9,520- 


- ■ 8,064 


19 






5,999 


■ 8,848 


! 8,960 


j 7,616 


26 






6.216 


8,064 


O , Ox 


: 3 , 400 


Total to February 


26 ■ 


224.239 


242,794 


254,057 


240 , 447 


Agricultural Attac 


he 


C 


. G. Taylor, 


London. 






BUTTER; Aug 


tralian grading, 


1937-38 seas 


on to February 12, 








with comparisons 






Late 


1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1937-38 


Week ended 




l t 000 pounds 


1,000 pounds 


ljOOO pounds 


1,000 pounds 


July 1- October 30. 






64,216 


54:, 800 


42,892 


43,260 


November 6 






8 , 590 


8 , 212 


4,997 


6,044 ' 


13 






8,803 


8 , 631 


5, 096 


6,561 


20 






7,526 


8,-384 


5, 696 


7,571 


27 






10.022 


8.086 


5.042 


7,338 


Monthly total... 




34 . 941 


Oy f OJ-0 


20.831 


27 , 514 


December 4 






8 , 570 


, 7,249 ' 


5,233 


3,411 


11 






9,914 


6,749 


4, 944 


7,159 


18 






9,204 


7,412 


4,384 


7,177 


25 






8 t 599 


5. 896 


3.147 


6,839 


Monthly total! \ . 






36,287 


27, 306 


17,708 


29,586 


January 1 






9 414 


8,575 


4,842 


7 , 054 


-8 






10,055 


7 , 943 


6, 962 


7 , 820 


15 






9,068 


6,433 


6,233 


6,760 


22 






9,177 


6,816 


6,303 


6,518 


29 






8,221 


7,258 


6.359 


6.164 


Monthly total . . 






49 t 935 


37,025 


30.704 


34,516 


February 5 






a ■ 


7,101 


5,761 


6,559 


12 






a/ 


6. 303 


5,678 


6,713 


Total to February 


12 


* ' s=r* • 


165, 348 


123, 574 


147,953 



Weekly Dairy Produce Notes, Imperial Economic Committee, a/ Not available. 



March 12, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



147 



3UTTER: Prices per pound in New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, 
and London, March 5, 1938, with comparisons 



"Week ' ended 



Market ■ and' description' 



March 4, 
1937 



February °4- 




March 3, 
1938 



New.York r .92 score : 

San .Francisco , 92 score ! 

Copenhagen, official quotation- 



London: 

Dani sh 

. -New .Zealand. 

. .r/atch. 



)ent s 

'34.5 
35.0 
21.2 



25.5 
19.5 
21.5 



Cents 

30.5 
30.0 
22.0 



27.8 
26.1 
2o • 2 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange. 



.LIVESTOCK A1ID MEAT 



i.: Price per 100 : pounds in -specified European markets, 
March 2, 1938, with comparisons a/ 



Market -and 'item 


; ' "Week ended . 


March 3,- • 
; 1937 : 


• -February 23, 
1938 


March 2, 
• 1938 




; Dollars 


. . Dollars 


Dollars 


Germany: 

. Price of hogs, Berlin 

Price of lard, tcs., Hamburg 


15.79 

13.91 


17.23 
10.98 


17.23 
1-1.24 


United. Kingdom: b/ 
. Prices, at. Liverpool, first 
quality - 

American short cut green 


'< 15 . 94 j 
I 18.78 ; 

15.37 ; 

20.52 

14.01 j 


15.24 
22.12 
19.04 

19.93 
11.80 


15.06 
22.85 
• 19.60 

20.35 
12.02 



Liverpool quotations are on the basis of sales from importer to wholesaler. 
aj Converted at current rate of exchange, 
b/ Week' ended Friday. 



l48 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 36, No, 10 



Index 



Page 

Late cables.... , 125 



Agricultural exports, principal 
commodities, U.S., 

January 1938; 130,133, i42 

Agricultural imports, principal' 
commodities, U.S., 

January 1938 130,133, 137, 1^3 

Barley: 

Production: 

Argentina, 1932-1937*. 144* 

Germany, 1932-1937..*. iW 

Bu 1 1 e r : 
G-radings : 

Australia, Feb. 12, 1938 l46 

New Zealand, Fe"b. 26, I93S.... l46 
Prices, foreign markets, 

.March 3, 1932 .'. l*+6 

Corn: 

Area, Argentina, 1932-19^7 lUU 

Crop prospects, Argentina, 

March I938 126 

Production, Argentina, 

I932-I937 12b, 144 

Cotton: 

Area, Argentina, 1936,1937 125 

Exports, U.S., March 3,' 1933.. 145 

Prices, U.K., March 4, 1932 145 

Production, Argentina, 193b, 1937 125 
Flaxseed, production, Argentina,, 

1932-1937 144 



Fage 

Hogs, numbers, Denmark, 

Dec. 31, 193 7 1^9 



Hops, supp ly s i tuat ion, 

U.K. , March 1932. .". 127 

Oats: 

Production.!. 

Argentina, 1932-1.937 144 

Germany, 1932*1937. . ... 144 



Peas (yellow soup) , import 

prospects, Canada, 1938. ....... . 122 

Pork:. 

I mp p rt , .quo .tas« . U, X. , 

Januaryr April 1932. . . . . ■ 122 

Imports, U.K., 1935-1937 129 

■ Prices, foreign markets, 

March 2, 1933 1U7 

Rye: 

Production: 

Argentina, :1932-1937 144 

Germany, 1932-1937.. l44 

Soybeans : 

-> Exp 0 r table su rp lus , Man chu r i a , 



Jan. 31, 1938..... ,.. 126 

Exports, Manchuria, 

October- January 1937-38 ,. 126 

Prices, Dairen, Feb. 25, 19 7 2... 127 
Stacks, Dairen, Jan. 31, 1P32... 127 
Vegetables.,, exports,. Mexican West 

Const, Feb. lr-15, 1932 127 

Whea t : 
Pro due t ion: 

Argentina, . 1932-1937 l44 

Germany, 1932-1937 144